Cappadocia – Amazing Ancient Underground Cities

Cappadocia – Amazing Ancient Underground Cities

Located in Central Anatolia in the country of Turkey, the ancient ruins of the Cappadocia region are among the world’s most amazing places. Covering an impressive 5,000 square kilometers these ruins offer awesome adventures to travelers.

Cappadocia 3
Image Courtesy of Alessandro Vasaturo via photopin cc

Millions of years ago, the area was blanketed with layers of thick ash by a series of volcanic eruptions. The ash turned into a soft rock layer, then slowly over time the fairy chimneys, spires, pillars, and mushroom formations of the region were formed by millions of years of erosion by wind and water.

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Image Courtesy of: Peter C in Toronto Canada via photopin cc

The area was first inhibited from 1800 to 1200 B.C., during the Hittite Era, but was unfortunately located right in the middle of powerful rival empires of the day. In fact, a host of rival factions surrounded Cappadocia, including the ancient Persians and the Greeks. Caught in the middle of this political unrest the inhabitants of the area were forced to protect their people and way of life by finding places to hide.

Cappadocia 10.
Image Courtesy of: alerque via photopin cc

The clever Troglodytes found that the soft rock of the unusual looking geological formations in the area could be carved away to create underground caves where their communities would be safer from the wars of their rival neighbors. They eventually moved entire communities underground, thus the underground dwellings were begun. They no doubt found the dwellings to also be a pleasant reprieve from the harsh conditions experienced at the surface level of their homeland region; hot, dry summers and cold, often snowy winters.

Cappadocia 9
Image Courtesy of: Jean & Nathalie via photopin cc

Later, around the fourth century A.D., the dwellings became a religious refuge when Christians fleeing religious persecution of the Roman Empire arrived and established communities there. The monks expanded on the existing dwellings, including monasteries and chapels into some of their new additions bringing the colorful art of Byzantine frescoes to the otherwise earthen tone walls of the underground structures. These works of art remain well preserved in the isolated caves to this day.

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Image Courtesy of: jikatu via photopin cc

Eventually the entire region became honeycombed with underground dwellings, creating entire cities consisting of massive expanses of magnificently conjoined living spaces, churches, stables, and food storage areas, some delving down to 20 stories underground!

Cappadocia
Image Courtesy of: Alaskan Dude via photopin cc

Today many of the Cappadocia caves have been modified to serve as modern homes, extensions on above ground homes, and some have been turned into hotels and tourist shops as well.

Cappadocia Today
Image Courtesy of: Adam Jones, Ph.D. – Global Photo Archive via photopin cc
Cappadocia Hotel
Image Courtesy of: Moyan_Brenn via photopin cc
Cappadocia Hotel 1
Image Courtesy of: calflier001 via photopin cc

Cappadocia Amazing Ancient Underground Cities are one of the most amazing places to visit and explore, with the before mentioned accommodations available to provide a place for isolated relaxation between adventures.

Want to see more images of Cappadocia? [Click Here to View Now!]

Cappadocia – Amazing Ancient Underground Cities

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