Strange Dragon Blood Trees

Strange Dragon Blood Trees

Despite their appearance, these strange trees are not some fictional foliage from a Harry Potter movie! Still, these Strange Dragon Blood are truly…weird to behold, especially knowing that their name “Dragon Blood Trees”, is due to their red colored sap or resin!

Strange Dragon Blood Trees

Dragon Blood Trees, also known as Cinnabar Trees, are found on Socotra Island, Yemen, as well as a precious few other places on earth. The trees can live to be more than 300 years old; some sources say they can live up to 600 years or more. They are a slow growing species possessing natural coloring and medicinal properties which were knowingly utilized by ancient Greeks and Romans.

These bizarre looking trees are hand planted and cared for by local residents, producing blossoms in February which take five months to produce fully ripe fruit. Despite the name of the tree, they do not produce the famed “Dragon Fruit”, though they do have great ecological importance, not only as a flagship species, but as an indicator species and an umbrella species as well.

Strange Dragon Blood Trees of Socotra Island Yemen

Immature Dragons Blood Trees, like the ones shown in the image above, will eventually branch out and acquire the upside down, “umbrella” shaped tops the trees are so well known for.

 Socotra Dragon Blood Trees

Other than medicine, Dragons Blood Trees are also used to make incense, clothing dye, and varnish, placing them on the list of very useful, and at the same time very odd looking, natural resources!

Strange Dragon Blood Trees

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Image Credits (In Order of Appearance)
photo credit: Rod Waddington via photopin cc
photo credit: Alexbip via photopin cc
photo credit: Rod Waddington via photopin cc
photo credit: Stefan Geens via photopin cc

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